Shinobi

Shinobi

He is a ninja from the UK and an excellent information collector.

The Costs of Living In Japan: Is Japan An Expensive Place to Live?

Living costs in Japan and especially in Tokyo are famous to be among the world's highest. However, if you live outside of central Tokyo, adjust to a Japanese lifestyle, and do not depend too heavily on food and products from your home country, you may be surprised how inexpensive Japan can be. Also in Japan's many dollar shops, you can find goods for less than $1.00 US that you would not find available anywhere else, and some of these are of reasonable quality.   Food Costs Local supermarkets are relatively inexpensive if you stick to Japanese food such as seasonal ...

The Difficulties Of Learning The Japanese Language

It has been said that Japanese is difficult to learn, but perhaps not as difficult as you would think. Whilst it may take a while to come to terms with the huge differences between Japanese and English, the spoken language is actually pretty simple, and the written language can be learned very successfully with a little hard work and logical planning. Obviously more difficult than most European languages, but probably easier than other "exotic languages", the lack of tones is a blessing for westerners.   The Japanese Language Is Not Difficult...? If looked at from a linguistic point of view, ...

The Japanese Work Culture – Over Time Working

The Japanese government has announced measures to limit the number of overtime employees can do – in an attempt to stop people literally working themselves to death. The Japanese may finally get to spend less time at work, but that doesn't mean they'll use it for shopping. The government is taking aim at the workforce's reputation for long hours, proposing fresh legislation limiting over time, potentially to 45 to 60 hours a month. While working to the point of collapse is associated with Japan, the phrase death from overwork has burrowed into the languages of other Asian countries where employee ...

Energy Drinks: Drinks that support busy people who have to work hard

Energy drinks are drinks that contain large doses of caffeine and other legal stimulants. It seems that we have now entered a generation where energy drinks have become so popular among Japanese teenagers and young adults. Japan has become a really busy and active society. Working hours tend to be long and Japanese people depend on coffee or energy drinks that both contain caffeine to start their day. Caffeine stimulates your nervous system, giving you energy and causes you to feel more alert of your everyday surroundings, and gives you that extra energy if you have had a lack of ...

Fuji mountain climbing: Not easy but worth the experience

 

Mount Fuji at 3776 meters, is Japan's highest and most prominent mountain. The mountain itself may look more attractive from afar than from close up, but the views on clear days and the experience of climbing through the early morning hours among hundreds of equally minded hikers from across the world are very rewarding and definitely worth trying once.   Mountaineering season Early July to mid-September is the official climbing season when the trails and mountain facilities are open. During this period the mountain is usually free of snow, the weather is relatively mild, access by public transportation is easy, ...

Daruma Doll: Write a pupil on one eye of Daruma to make your wish come true

The Daruma doll, also known as a Dharma doll, is a hollow, round, Japanese traditional doll modeled after Bodhidharma, the founder of the Zen sect of Buddhism. These dolls, though typically red and depicting a bearded man (Dharma), vary greatly in color and design depending on region and artist. Though considered an Omocha, meaning toy, by some, Daruma has a design that is rich in symbolism and is regarded more as a talisman of good luck to the Japanese. Daruma is one of the most popular talismans of good luck in modern Japan.   A brief history of the Daruma ...

You might say that you hate bread in Japan: Japanese bread

While you might think of Japan as a nation of rice, you'd be surprised by the utter ubiquity of bakeries in the country. Bread has taken a long time to rise here, but the results are remarkably appetizing! So let’s begin by looking briefly at the history of bread in Japan.   Bread In Japan A Brief History Bread first came to Japan through Portuguese traders and missionaries in the mid-16th century. However, Christianity was banned in the early 17th century, and any toehold bread had made went with it. But the name stuck, the Japanese word for bread in ...

What is Shojin-Ryori? Is it Perfect for Vegetarians?

Shojin-ryori is the traditional dining style of Buddhist monks in Japan and grew widespread in popularity with the spread of Zen Buddhism in the 13th century. As the cuisine is made without meat, fish, or other animal products, it can be enjoyed by vegans, vegetarians, and meat-eaters alike. A typical Shojin-ryori meal is centered around soybean-based foods like tofu along with seasonal vegetables and wild mountain plants, which are believed to bring balance and alignment to the body, mind, and spirit. This simple meal contributed to Japan’s elegant haute cuisine called "Kaiseki", and today can be eaten at the dining ...

Wasabi : More Than Just a Hot Sushi Condiment

Wasabi—the innocent-looking green paste that accompanies sushi and sashimi, a too-big bite of which can make your eyes water and sinuses explode! Real wasabi (Wasabia japonica, or Japanese horseradish) is native to Japan, where it has been cultivated for at least a thousand years. Mentions of the plant have been found in botanical books and dictionaries in Japan that trace back to 794 CE.   Wasabi Wasabi is green and has a refreshing aroma and spiciness. Grated rhizomes are mainly used as condiments for sushi, sashimi, and buckwheat noodles. Wasabi is an indispensable part of Japanese food culture. Wasabi, which is ...

How to survive the heat of summer in Japan, which is too hot

I’ve long dreaded summer, it’s my least favorite season, at least in Japan. Back in Europe, I didn’t mind the summers because they were dry heat. It’s early July, the rainy season is more or less over now in Japan for this year, and temperatures are already mirroring those of last year on some days. It seems that during the summertime in Japan no matter where I go, it’s almost like the heat keeps constantly bugging me. To Survive The Summer In Japan Here are some tips for surviving the Japanese summer heat –many of these tips will help you ...

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