culture

Shogi –

Shogi also knew as Japanese chess or the Generals' Game, is a two-player strategy board game in the same family as Western (international) chess and is the most popular of a family of chess variants native to Japan. Shōgi means generals. The earliest predecessor of the game, chaturanga, originated in India in the 6th century. Shogi in its present form was played as early as the 16th century, while a direct ancestor without the drop rule was recorded from 1210 in a historical document Nichūreki, which is an edited copy of Shōchūreki and Kaichūreki from the late Heian period (c. ...

Sumo Wrestling: It's both a Shinto Ritual and a Sport

Sumo wrestling or Sumo is a competitive full-contact wrestling sport where a rikishi (wrestler) attempts to force another wrestler out of a circular ring or the Dohyō or into touching the ground with anything other than the soles of his feet. The sport originated in Japan, the only country where it is practiced professionally It is generally considered a Gendai-budō (a modern Japanese martial art), however, this definition is misleading, as the sport has a history spanning many centuries. Many ancient traditions have been preserved in sumo, and even today the sport includes many ritual elements, such as the use ...

Maneki Neko: Cat That Strongly Invites Good Luck

The Maneki-Neko (literally "beckoning cat") is a common Japanese figurine (lucky charm, talisman) which is often believed to bring good luck to the owner. In modern times, they are usually made of ceramic or plastic. The figurine depicts a cat (traditionally a calico Japanese Bobtail) beckoning with an upright paw, and is usually displayed in—often at the entrance of—shops, restaurants, pachinko parlors, and other businesses. The Maneki-Neko is sometimes also called the welcoming cat, lucky cat, money cat, happy cat, raging cat, beckoning cat, or fortune cat in English.   Various Types Maneki-Neko comes in different colors, styles and degrees ...

The Japanese Work Culture – Over Time Working

The Japanese government has announced measures to limit the number of overtime employees can do – in an attempt to stop people literally working themselves to death. The Japanese may finally get to spend less time at work, but that doesn't mean they'll use it for shopping. The government is taking aim at the workforce's reputation for long hours, proposing fresh legislation limiting over time, potentially to 45 to 60 hours a month. While working to the point of collapse is associated with Japan, the phrase death from overwork has burrowed into the languages of other Asian countries where employee ...

Fuji mountain climbing: Not easy but worth the experience

 

Mount Fuji at 3776 meters, is Japan's highest and most prominent mountain. The mountain itself may look more attractive from afar than from close up, but the views on clear days and the experience of climbing through the early morning hours among hundreds of equally minded hikers from across the world are very rewarding and definitely worth trying once.   Mountaineering season Early July to mid-September is the official climbing season when the trails and mountain facilities are open. During this period the mountain is usually free of snow, the weather is relatively mild, access by public transportation is easy, ...

Daruma Doll: Write a pupil on one eye of Daruma to make your wish come true

The Daruma doll, also known as a Dharma doll, is a hollow, round, Japanese traditional doll modeled after Bodhidharma, the founder of the Zen sect of Buddhism. These dolls, though typically red and depicting a bearded man (Dharma), vary greatly in color and design depending on region and artist. Though considered an Omocha, meaning toy, by some, Daruma has a design that is rich in symbolism and is regarded more as a talisman of good luck to the Japanese. Daruma is one of the most popular talismans of good luck in modern Japan.   A brief history of the Daruma ...

Have a special holiday at Ryokan. A Japanese classic style inn.

Ryokan is Japanese style inns found throughout the country, especially in hot spring resorts. More than just a place to sleep, a ryokan is an opportunity to experience the traditional Japanese lifestyle and hospitality, Ryokans were once the main place a traveler would stay in Japan. Today the Ryokan has changed very little in style but is more of a place where tourists go to get a real feel of what living in a traditional Japanese home is like. incorporating elements such as tatami floors, futon beds, Japanese style baths, and local cuisine, making them popular with both Japanese and ...

Do Japanese people have a prejudice against tattoos? History of Japanese tattoos

In Japan, it is common to see "no tattoos allowed" signs at establishments such as restaurants, public bathing areas (Onsen), gyms, public swimming pools. But why is this? Tattooing is the most misunderstood form of art in contemporary Japan. Demonized by centuries of prohibitions and rarely discussed today in civilized circles, people with tattoos are outcasts in their own country — banned from many beaches, pools, and public baths.   Reason Ask anyone to explain the reason for this vilification and most will blame the yakuza and their penchant for body ink; better-informed citizens may even trace the roots of ...

Escalator In Japan: Do Not Ride In The Middle?

Escalators are used around the world in places where elevators would be impractical. Principal areas of usage include department stores, shopping malls, airports, transit systems (railway/railroad stations), convention centers, hotels, arenas, stadiums, and public buildings. An escalator is a vertical transportation device in the form of a moving staircase – a conveyor that carries people between floors of a building. Like vending machines, canned coffee, and convenience stores, escalators seem to be ubiquitous in modern Japan. This is especially true in Tokyo, with its many multi-storied buildings with basements, and if you take public transportation, as you descend (and ascend) ...

Yukata: Japan's Summer Special Attire!

Yukata is one of the traditional clothing in Japan that wears in the summer. It has a shape similar to a kimono and is made mainly of thin cotton fabric, but there are fabrics mixed with hemp and silk. Yukata is cheaper than kimono and it is easy to wear. Therefore, it is popular among a wide range of ages ranging from children to elderly people.   History of Yukata Originally Yukata wore to take off the moisture of the skin after taking it from the bath. Yukata wearing a bathrobe. Afterward, when public baths were spread, they use it ...

© 2021 YUNOMI Powered by AFFINGER5