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Do Japanese people have a prejudice against tattoos? History of Japanese tattoos

In Japan it is common to see a "no tattoos allowed" signs at establishments such as restaurants, public bathing areas (Onsen), gyms, public swimming pools. But why is this? Tattooing is the most misunderstood form of art in contemporary Japan. Demonized by centuries of prohibitions and rarely discussed today in civilized circles, people with tattoos are outcasts in their own country — banned from many beaches, pools and public baths.   Reason Ask anyone to explain the reason for this vilification and most will blame the yakuza and their penchant for body ink; better-informed itizens may even trace the roots ...

Miso: One of the basic seasonings in Japan

Soy bean paste : Like soy sauce, miso is made from soy beans.It is a paste-like condiment mostly in a brown color. It's a thick paste, usually some shade of reddish-brown, made by mixing crushed boiled soybeans with salt and a koji fermenting agent produced from rice, barley, wheat or beans. Traditionally the mix was wrapped in straw and left to ferment for between two months and two years. Protein-rich miso is one of the essential elements of Japanese cuisine. It has been around since at least the 7th century, and the standard fare of rice (barley for the poor), ...

Toliets In Japan:Where are you aiming for? The unique evolution of the toilet does not stop

Some Japanese toilets are an attraction all in their own, with a range of technological features that are sure to alarm the first time user. The high tech toilets, which are in most homes, hotels and shopping centres, feature an electronic panel that controls an array of handy features including seat warmers, hot air dryers and tiny robotic arms that squirt warm water at the guest. These technological marvels have become commonly known as washlet, a name that is the trademark of Toto, the largest manufacture of these high tech bidets. Japan is the world’s leader of toilet technology, some ...

Escalator in Japan: Do not ride in the middle?

Escalators are used around the world in places where elevators would be impractical. Principal areas of usage include department stores, shopping malls, airports, transit systems (railway/railroad stations), convention centers, hotels, arenas, stadiums, and public buildings. An escalator is a vertical transportation device in the form of a moving staircase – a conveyor which carries people between floors of a building. Like vending machines, canned coffee, and convenience stores, escalators seem to be ubiquitous in modern Japan. This is especially true in Tokyo, with its many multi-storied buildings with basements, and if you take public transportation, as you descend (and ascend) ...

Iced coffee is my buddy? Japanese summer too hot!

In Japan, iced coffee has been drunk since Taishō period (around the 1920s) in coffeehouses. It is served with gum syrup and milk. Japan's summer is very hot and iced coffee is loved by many people. Cold tea was already popular, so it was natural to drink cold coffee. Freshly brewed and full of flavor, Iced Coffee is the perfect pick-me-up any time of day or night, giving you the boost you need to keep on running! It takes some planning, but its full, rich flavor makes the wait worthwhile.   How is it made? The ideal coffee for this ...

yukata: Japan's summer special attire!

Yukata is one of the traditional clothing in Japan that wears in the summer. It has a shape similar to a kimono and is made mainly of thin cotton fabric, but there are fabrics mixed with hemp and silk. Yukata is cheaper than kimono and it is easy to wear. Therefore, it is popular among a wide range of age ranging from children to elderly people.   History of Yukata Originally Yukata wore to take off the moisture of the skin after taking it from the bath. Yukata wearing as a bath robe. Afterwards, when public baths were spread, they ...

HASHI: Chopsticks and Japanese

Haushi, chopsticks, are tableware, but they have symbolic caning for the Japanese. It is said that the Japanese start and end their lives with chopsticks. At each turning point in life, there is a ceremony using chopsticks. A baby and its parents celebrate me 100th day after its birth as kuizome (first meal) and the baby meets chopsticks. Other celebratory hashi are enmusubi (match-making) hashi, meoto (married couple) hashi at the wedding, and chõju (longevity) hashi. In Buddhism, when one dies, his/her family members moistens the lips of the deceased with matsugo no mizu (last water before death) applied using ...

The Japanese and Sake: RICE WINE

Sake is made from rice. Kõji (malted rice) and water are added to steamed rice, and this mixture placed in a vat is left to ferment with yeast for 20 days. After fermentation the mixture is ready for pressing, filtration and heating. Sake, often called seishu (lit. clear sake), is a fermented alcoholic beverage made from rice. Of all brewed alcoholic beverages, it is the highest proof. this has been a Japanese alcoholic beverage since ancient times. Sake has a wine-like aroma When drunk cold, good sake has a taste similar to fine quality wine. As a result, there are some ...

Sashimi is a method of eating fresh fish beautifully and delicious

I can recall someone told me decades ago with a subtle tone of creepiness ‘I heard Japanese eat fish raw? Then I clarified by saying Yes, but they are neatly cut and arranged on a dish plate – not catch and eat. Now many people know how the raw fishes are eaten in Japanese style it’s a decent seafood preparation called ‘Sashimi’, widely appreciated anywhere in the world. Actually, ‘Sushi’ is a rice dish on which ‘Sashimi’ is placed Since Sashimi is eaten raw, the ingredient has to be exceptionally fresh. You know things in an afterlife can rapidly degrade ...

Soroban:The more you use the soroban, the faster your calculathing skil becomes

Abacus might have been quite replaced by calculator by now. But actually, as far as the speed and preciseness are concerned, abacus would quite surpass the calculator if it is operated by an experienced user.   Soroban Japanese abacus, called ‘Soroban’ is made to be just simple; a number of rods lined in a rectangle frame. Each rod has 1 bead and 4 beads that are divided by a bar in between. A bead placed above the bar represents a number of five (5) and the each of 4 beads under the bar means a number of one (1). Therefore ...

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